Jesvin Yeo

Good in Graphic Design.

Jesvin Yeo

About Jesvin Yeo

Jesvin Yeo, who trained at Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design in London, is a multidisciplinary designer who explores natures and consequences of historical and contemporary cultural changes, in particular areas related to Asian Material Culture and Heritage Studies. Of her core art and design interests, are the confluences of cultural elements, cultural identities and tradition, and their interface with emerging elements of the modern contemporary world. Jesvin founded Designing Cultures Studio which produced award-winning works that have been featured in international design publications including Wallpaper*, HOW Magazine, Communication Arts, PRINT and Applied Arts, as well as exhibited at galleries and museums in Berlin, London, Washington D.C, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Taipei and Beijing. Among 55 international design awards she received are the prestigious Red Dot Award (Communication Design), German Design Award, GOOD DESIGN™ Award and iF Communication Design Award.

  • Winner of 6 A' Design Awards.
  • Good in Graphic Design.
  • Original Design.
  • Highly Creative, Diligent and Innovative.
  • All Designs
  • Graphic
  • Print
  • Gift
50s news-gift paper Poster

50s news-gift paper Poster

Graphic Design

Bambook Book

Bambook Book

Graphic Design

Visual/Senses Editorial Design

Visual/Senses Editorial Design

Graphic Design

Vanishing Crafts Book

Vanishing Crafts Book

Print Design

Beanlly Wrist Rest

Beanlly Wrist Rest

Gift Design

3D Embossed Book

3D Embossed Book

Print Design


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Interview with Jesvin Yeo

Can you tell us more about your company / design studio?
Designing Cultures Studio is a non-profit studio, and we have won more than 60 design awards, including the Red Dot Award, GOOD DESIGN™ Award and iF Communication Design Award.
What is "design" for you?
Good communication design should be based on the value of culture and heritage and include new ideas and thoughts to stimulate people to think beyond the obvious. It should also be beautiful, connect with people emotionally and leave a profound impact.
What kinds of works do you like designing most?
I am interested in projects that allow me to examine the different notions and levels of aesthetics that are manifested in the tradition of Asian arts and crafts. Especially how the value of what is deemed culturally acceptable in aesthetics changes in response to its ongoing dialogue with the contemporary. The facets that I wish to focus on are the age-old question of self-identity and semantics; how these evolve and transmute themselves in the cultural zeitgeist or whose meaning is erased through globalisation. It is interesting to observe how the pockets of diverse culture collectives view and struggle to comprehend internationalism through the coloured lenses bestowed on them by their respective heritage and how this, in turn, influences cross-regional and international relations.
Where does the design inspiration for your works come from? How do you feed your creativity? What are your sources of inspirations?
My creativity comes from everyday experience, and my inspiration comes from Asian culture, traditions and lifestyles. I am always fascinated by cultural elements, the integration of cultural identity and practices, and their interaction with aspects of the modern world.
Where do you live? Do you feel the cultural heritage of your country affects your designs? What are the pros and cons during designing as a result of living in your country?
I live in Singapore. My cultural heritage profoundly influences my design because I believe that creativity and innovation can be derived from the deep roots of local cultural heritage and crafts. My design can be regarded as cultural artefacts. Visually, they are very oriental. In Singapore, I feel that we visual communication designers are limited by printing technology. Local printers are not open to experimental printing because they are more business-driven.
Could you please share some pearls of wisdom for young designers? What are your suggestions to young, up and coming designers?
The leading quality of a successful communication designer is hard work, being considerate in terms of social responsibility and ecological sensitivity, and can express the attitudes and ideas of customers and themselves.
Any other things you would like to cover that have not been covered in these questions?
So far, the construction of Singapore's Chinatown Visitor Center has been the biggest challenge for me. My team must pay attention to all aspects of our design because this is an architectural project. The challenge includes integrating display, graphic design and architecture into a unified work. We are learning every day while doing this project.

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