Amarist Studio

Specialized in Social Design.

Amarist Studio

About Amarist Studio

Amarist is a creative studio based in Barcelona, formed by the artists and designers Clara Campo and Arán Lozano. Active in contemporary Art and Design, the studio focuses on the creation of functional pieces capable of stimulating the thoughts of the viewer through works that invite to reflect on the world around us. Amarist designs have already been exhibited internationally in solo shows in venues like Design Days Dubai or Art New York, and have been published in magazines like Forbes, Financial Times, Harper's Bazaar, Elle Decoration, etc. Clara Campo and Arán Lozano have been recently listed on Forbes 30 under 30 list of 2018 among the most influential people in the field of Art and Culture.

  • Winner of 3 A' Design Awards.
  • Specialized in Social Design.
  • Original Design.
  • Creative, Diligent and Innovative.
  • All Designs
  • Social
  • Limited Edition
  • Luxury
Welcome  Jewelry

Welcome Jewelry

Social Design

Friendly Fire Lamp

Friendly Fire Lamp

Limited Edition Design

Thesaurus Console Table

Thesaurus Console Table

Luxury Design


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Interview with Amarist Studio

Could you please tell us more about your art and design background? What made you become an artist/designer? Have you always wanted to be a designer?
We never had a clear idea of becoming designers, I think it was a process of maturation in which we discovered that we had a good time designing and we had curiosity and restlessness for this world, so in 2014 we started to create what today is Amarist Studio.
Can you tell us more about your company / design studio?
Amarist is a creative studio based in Barcelona, Spain. Created in 2014 by Arán Lozano and Clara Campo.We are mainly dedicated to contemporary art and design, focusing our work on the creation of functional pieces, with great visual power and capable of stimulating the observer's thoughts through works that invite to reflect on the world around us.In our last year we have focused our attention on observing the imbalances and gaps that we produce as a species in the different cultural groups.A work that explores the shocks and contradictions that society produces in its evolution, in this aspect we have become involved in projects more linked to social activism, such as our collection of solidary jewelry for Refugees "Welcome".We are young and with many concerns so we are always embracing new opportunities for growth and development within the studio, so our fields of action are increasing.
What kinds of works do you like designing most?
Pieces that have a soul, that are able to inspire and make reflect people. In our studio generally unique pieces of furniture, with a very important conceptual emphasis and a bold character.
What is your most favorite design, could you please tell more about it?
We don’t have an exclusive favorite design. There’s so many good works in the world and through out history to be able to choose one.From our personal work, we always say that our favorite design is always the one that is to come when we start a new project.
What was the first thing you designed for a company?
The first piece we designed in the studio was “Cupiditas” table made of Alabaster Stone and retro-lit by LED lights, we wanted to use a very special material from our region.
What is your favorite material / platform / technology?
We don’t really have a favorite material, platform or technology. But we do give a lot of value, and in our pieces are always present, to noble materials, marbles, woods, metals...We do like to work and experiment with different mediums, from traditional work techniques to new technologies and new digital fabrication methods. And we always stay open to new innovations.
When do you feel the most creative?
When we visit new places, quarries, factories, shows, where we see chaos of materials, tools or new work techniques. From the workshop of an artisan, to an R+D+I center where we can discover new metholodogies.
Which aspects of a design do you focus more during designing?
First we focus on the meaning or message behind what we are designing; the soul and visual power of the piece. And then the technical aspects like the proportions, dimensions and materiality.
What kind of emotions do you feel when you design?
At the creative peak of idea generation, it’s kind of weird, we connect with the subconscious of our minds, and time and space disappear for that precious moment.During the design and production process we go through a big spectrum in which all kinds of emotions circulate at every stage of the process.
What kind of emotions do you feel when your designs are realized?
Depending on the work, how long it has taken to design and to build afterwards. In general we feel great happiness, realization and sometimes even tears in our eyes.
When judging a design as good or bad, which aspects do you consider first?
How the different elements that configure the piece (shape, materiality, usage, light/shadow, rhythm, etc) become a unique entity where nothing can be added or subtracted, with a soul that makes you fall in love with it and touches you.
From your point of view, what are the responsibilities of a designer for society and environment?
Design has the power to help improve society and help people be the best versions of themselves. In our area of work, collectible design, we try to provoke with our designs, generate debates around challenging ideas.Design along with Art, has the power to provoke emotions and reactions with which to think and reflect. A society with awakened minds is the only one that can evolve and improve.And of course, as designers we should all draw a red line to protect the environment, taking into consideration the materials that we use and their process of fabrication.
How do you think the "design field" is evolving? What is the future of design?
Now it seems that there is a fever for new technologies and for everything that is made with new digital production methodologies ....Actually in our new collection we will try to reflect on where we are going as a field, reflect on the new technologies and where the traditional materials and artisans will remain.It is clear that in the next 5 years 3D printing, robotics and AI applied to production will take a very important leap and expand the fields of action. This, together with open source, will accentuate the democratization of production to the non-professional public. We hope it doesn’t happen as with photography, that since the emergence of the latest generation of mobile phones, everyone has taken on the role of photographer, in deterioration of the profession.
When was your last exhibition and where was it? And when do you want to hold your next exhibition?
Our last exhibition was in Art New York, in May 2017, it was an installation that we made for UNHCR, addressing the issue of borders and refugees.Our next exhibition is in Venice Design 2018, in the framework of the International Biennale of Architecture, opening next May for six months. We are very excited!
Where does the design inspiration for your works come from? How do you feed your creativity? What are your sources of inspirations?
There’s a common believe that we just create an evolution of things that we have already seen. We think the sources of inspiration are an intertwined combination of history, detection of problems/opportunities, new tech and materials, and context. Sometimes an emotional experience, like a trip, a concert or a movie also help to shake and awake ideas.We feed our creativity immersing ourselves in nature, letting our minds and bodies disconnect from daily life. Also, reading books, visiting museums and art/design fairs.
How would you describe your design style? What made you explore more this style and what are the main characteristics of your style? What's your approach to design?
We think we still don’t have a design style defined. Although in all of our collections you can see pieces with a deep visual power making the observer think and reflect, we are in a constant process of evolution and we do not like to be pigeonholed in a specific style. What we designed 3 years ago has little to do with what we do now, and in the medium term we are planning new collections that will be quite different from the current ones. We value the reinvention capacity we have.
Where do you live? Do you feel the cultural heritage of your country affects your designs? What are the pros and cons during designing as a result of living in your country?
We live between Barcelona and New York and we also spend seasons in our small town in the Spanish Pyrenees.So as you can imagine it generates a quite broad spectrum, this is very positive for the design, maybe that's why our style evolves constantly and we are capable of doing things that a priori can be very different.Each city has a rhythm, a culture and generates different influences that of course affect your design, as does the political, economic or social moments of our environment.
How do you work with companies?
At the moment we do not usually design products for other companies, we are focused on our collections or on projects that are commissioned to us by private clients.
What are your suggestions to companies for working with a designer? How can companies select a good designer?
We have never worked for a company in that sense, we guess we would recommend to not set too many constrains on the designer and preconceptions on the design, let the designer’s creativity free and then work and evolve from the first ideas generated.To select a good designer, the company has to know first what they want to achieve, what message they want to transmit through the style of design, and then select accordingly.
Can you talk a little about your design process?
More or less we go through the same cycle when I start a new project: 1. Research2. Hand sketches3. Digital modeling4. Physical models5. Repeat/revisit steps 2-3-46. Development in detail7. Fabrication tests8. Final product.
What are 5 of your favorite design items at home?
We are quite minimalist, a large dining table along with comfortable chairs and a sculptural lamp are elements that we highly value.
Can you describe a day in your life?
We generally wake up and do a little exercise, meditate and have a big breakfast while reading the news.We usually save the morning for the most creative work and the afternoon for emails and meetings.After work we try to do activities to clear our minds, like sport, going to an art opening or hanging out with friends.
Could you please share some pearls of wisdom for young designers? What are your suggestions to young, up and coming designers?
We think we are still on an early stage of our career to be able to give that type of advice. And each design field is different, but what we would recommend to anyone is that if you have an idea, a vision, go for it, communicate it, trace a plan of how to make it come to life, and work work, work, persevere, and work more. Make people fall in love with your idea.
From your perspective, what would you say are some positives and negatives of being a designer?
The positive is the personal realization of unleashing creativity, of making ideas come to life. The negative is the economic instability that often comes with creative professions.
What is your "golden rule" in design?
We can’t mark a design as finished if it doesn’t make us fall in love.
What skills are most important for a designer?
Knowledge, creativity, communication, challenging assumptions, flexibility of mind, and ability to stay updated on design new tools.A balance between the freshness of creative ideas and the ability to technically carry them out.
Which tools do you use during design? What is inside your toolbox? Such as software, application, hardware, books, sources of inspiration etc.?
Research on books and internet, hand drawing, digital modeling, building physical models, making fabrication tests…
Designing can sometimes be a really time consuming task, how do you manage your time?
Ha! Good question, time is always a problem. We are still in the process of learning. It’s important to set the limits and know when to stop, in art and design a work is rarely ever complete, you can always change, improve, develop further details, etc. The best time manager is a deadline, and to plan the different stages of the design accordingly.
How long does it take to design an object from beginning to end?
It depends on the object, the technical challenges, innovation, dimensions, materials, etc. It’s impossible to set a same timeframe for every design.
What was your most important job experience?
Perhaps the collaboration with UNHCR on our solidarity jewelry collection. For its social component is of special importance and responsibility for us.Also, we are currently working on our first public project; it’s a great challenge and a huge responsibility.
Who are some of your clients?
Our clients are mainly private art and design collectors, museums or institutions.
What type of design work do you enjoy the most and why?
To design not just based on functionality but based on emotions and experience as well. To not fall into the routine of working always on the same, reinventing ourselves and addressing new challenges.
What are your future plans? What is next for you?
We are working on our first public sculptural design which is a huge milestone. Our goal is to expand internationally and start working with top intl galleries.
Do you work as a team, or do you develop your designs yourself?
We work in tandem - Clara and Aran - in the studio to mark the creative lines and develop the projects technically, supported by a small technical team if the project requires it.
Do you have any works-in-progress being designed that you would like to talk about?
We are designing a new collection of furniture that is defined as a look into the future, the collection composed of a series of pieces with very futuristic aesthetics, combining traditional materials together with 3D printing, representing a kind of struggle where the pieces will seem to be evolving.We also have a surprise prepared to create the first Clock with AI, which will mark the starting point of this new design line.
How can people contact you?
Through our website www.amarist.com, by social media @amariststudio and by email at info@amarist.com

Designer of the Day Interview with Amarist Studio

Could you please tell us about your experience as a designer, artist, architect or creator?
I graduated from my Masters in Architecture at 25yo and had the great opportunity to fly to California to design a house for a private client. I spent a year there and I then was hired by an Architecture+Urbanism firm in Zurich, Switzerland, where I worked on a urban planning competition to design a whole new neighborhood in Marseille, and we won! So by 27yo I could say I had designed, along wonderful teams, a house and a neighborhood. It was very fulfilling, but I felt the need to start my own venture and that is how I joined Aran Lozano to build Amarist Studio. Since then it has been a rollercoaster ride, a great journey of learning and growth, a path full of difficulties but also with big achievements.
How did you become a designer?
I never had a clear idea of becoming an architect/designer, I think it was a process of maturation in which I discovered that I liked three fundamentals: art-creativity, functionality-engineering, and business.
What are your priorities, technique and style when designing?
My top priority is making designs that have a soul, that are able to inspire and make people reflect. I don’t stop working on a project until it is an entity as a whole, where nothing can be added or subtracted. The ultimate goal is to make the user/observer fall in love with the piece (concept + aesthetics).I don’t have a specific technique, but more or less I go through the same cycle when designing: 1. Research2. Hand sketches3. Digital modeling4. Physical models5. Repeat/revisit steps 2-3-46. Development in detail7. Fabrication tests8. Final product.
Which emotions do you feel when designing?
At the creative peak of idea generation, it’s kind of weird, I connect with the subconscious of my mind, and time and space disappear for that precious moment. It is a great feeling!During the production process I go through a big spectrum of emotions in which all kinds of feelings and moods circulate at every stage of the process.At the end, when the work is finished, in general I feel great happiness and realization. Sometimes, depending on the work and how long it has taken to design and to build, even my eyes get wet of excitement.
What particular aspects of your background shaped you as a designer?
Love for nature, philosophy and art. Big observer of things and surroundings.Attention to detail, search for (non-existent)perfection.Being organized.
What is your growth path? What are your future plans? What is your dream design project?
Our goal is to expand internationally and start working with top international galleries. Exhibiting in museums and the prominent art and design fairs. We are working on our first public architecture-sculpture design which is a huge milestone for us and we hope to have more opportunities like this one.
What are your advices to designers who are at the beginning of their career?
I think I am still at the beginning of my career … hahahWhat I would recommend to anyone is that if you have an idea, a vision of what you want to do/become, you have to pursue it, communicate it, trace a plan of how to make it happen, and work work, work, persevere, and work more. Make people fall in love with your vision. The journey is difficult and the only way to make progress is being passionate, working hard and efficiently.
You are truly successful as a designer, what do you suggest to fellow designers, artists and architects?
I don’t consider myself as a successful designer just yet, I am young and just getting started.What I would recommend to everyone is to take the time to educate their clients.
What is your day to day look like?
I generally wake up and do a little exercise, meditate and have a big breakfast while reading the news.I usually save the morning for the most creative work and the afternoon for emails and meetings. I finish the day planning what is important to get done on the next day.After work I try to do activities to clear my mind, like sport, going to an art opening or hanging out with friends.
How do you keep up with latest design trends? To what extent do design trends matter?
I keep up with latest design trends through yearly art and design international fairs, exhibitions in galleries, online and printed publications and social media.Trends matter to measure what the market is demanding and what is selling. But rends can be creativity killers, if you want to make a difference you shouldn't base your work on trends.
How do you know if a product or project is well designed? How do you define good design?
A design is good when it has a soul. When the different elements that configure the piece (shape, materiality, usage, light/shadow, rhythm, etc) become a unique entity where nothing can be added or subtracted, with a soul that makes you fall in love with it and touches you something inside you.
How do you decide if your design is ready?
Ha! Good question, in art and design a work is rarely ever complete, you can always change, improve, develop further details, etc. A good rule of thumb is when a piece become a unique entity as a whole, where nothing can be added or subtracted.
What is your biggest design work?
Our biggest design work at Amarist Studio is probably the collaboration with UNHCR – United Nations Refugee Agency - for our first philanthropic design project: the “Welcome” Jewelry Collection. Because its social component is a project of special importance and responsibility for us.In addition, our most important work-in-progress project that we have right now is a sculptural canopy for a public plaza; which is a great challenge and a huge responsibility for us too.
Who is your favourite designer?
I don’t have an exclusive favorite architect/designer. There’s so many good creators in the world and through out history to be able to choose one.As an architect I specially admire Peter Zumthor, his buildings have something truly special; they have the ability to touch your soul.
Would you tell us a bit about your lifestyle and culture?
I live between Barcelona and New York. Each city has a rhythm, a culture, and generates different influences that affect one’s design, as it does the political, economic and social momentum.
Would you tell us more about your work culture and business philosophy?
At Amarist Studio we work as a team, we design together and grow on each other ideas. Our goal – and business - is to create designs that stimulate the thoughts of the viewer, that invites them to experience and reflect on the world around. We try to make the users fall in love with our pieces.
What are your philanthropic contributions to society as a designer, artist and architect?
This last year at Amarist Studio we created our first solidarity project to raise awareness and funds for refugees. Deeply touched by the current Syrian refugee crisis we wanted to get involved. Inspired by the razor wire installed along the southeastern European borders, we designed the “Welcome Jewelry”, a solidarity collection with all proceeds donated to UNHCR – the United Nations Refugee Agency. We want to create a universal symbol with the razor wire spikes, a symbol of respect and support for the war-displaced people around the world.
What positive experiences you had when you attend the A’ Design Award?
Design competitions like the A’ Design Awards are important as a platform for the field, winning an award brings exposure and opens new doors and opportunities.

Extended Interview with Amarist Studio

Could you please tell us about your experience as a designer, artist, architect or creator?
CLARA CAMPO: I graduated from my Masters in Architecture at 25yo and had the great opportunity to fly to California to design a house for a private client. I spent a year working there and I then was hired by an Architecture+Urbanism firm in Zurich, Switzerland, where I worked on a urban planning competition to design a whole new neighborhood in Marseille, and we won! So by 27yo I could say I had designed, along wonderful teams, a house and a neighborhood. It was very fulfilling, but I felt the need to start my own venture and that is how I joined Aran Lozano to build Amarist Studio. Since then it has been a rollercoaster ride, a great journey of learning and growth, a path full of difficulties but also with big achievements. ARÁN LOZANO: I did not carry out a specific academic education in design, it was a self-taught process, experimenting with materials, techniques and technologies.
How did you become a designer?
CLARA CAMPO: I like to create and build experiences, buildings, objects…. Solve problems and functionality challenges. I never had a clear idea of becoming an architect/designer, I think it was a process of maturation in which I discovered that I liked three fundamentals: art-creativity, functionality-engineering, and business. ARÁN LOZANO: I never thought I wanted to be a designer ... I think I became one without wanting to, chasing my curiosities and satisfying my concerns, I discovered that I was happy when creating.
What are your priorities, technique and style when designing?
CLARA CAMPO: I don’t think anyone can be forced to be a designer. As any field you have to love what you do otherwise it is impossible to do great work. ARÁN LOZANO: I do not think anyone can devote themselves to being creative by being forced to do so ...
Which emotions do you feel when designing?
CLARA CAMPO: Because of my Architecture foundation, I design anything from buildings to urban plans to furniture. Despite the differences on these fields I think they have a lot in common, and there are multiple examples of architects through out history with works in all of these three disciplines. At Amarist Studio we currently have a good balance of different type of projects, and that is very fulfilling. ARAN LOZANO: I like conceptual design, works that are able to shake minds, provoke and with a big visual power.
What particular aspects of your background shaped you as a designer?
CLARA CAMPO: I don’t consider myself a design legend. I am just at the beginning of my career… I would recommend young designers should study history of art, architecture and design to have a good foundation. Work hard on their vision and dreams of who they want to become. ARAN LOZANO: Hahaha I do not think I am a design legend. If one day I am, maybe then I can save everyone work and explain the secret recepie... For now I can only say that you have to work hard, visualize the top you want to reach, be bold in the decisions you make and prepare a large dose of perseverance.
What is your growth path? What are your future plans? What is your dream design project?
CLARA CAMPO: The ability to give a soul to their designs, when is able to touch and move the users. ARAN LOZANO: A good designer is able to create a product that solves the need in the most efficient way. A great designer I think that also breaks with the established, surprises, and sets new limits.
What are your advices to designers who are at the beginning of their career?
CLARA CAMPO: Observing how the different elements that configure the piece (shape, materiality, usage, light/shadow, rhythm, etc) become a unique entity where nothing can be added or subtracted, with a soul that can touch you. ARAN LOZANO: A design is really good when you fall in love with it.
What is your day to day look like?
CLARA CAMPO: Not having the time is an excuse. I would go to areas affected by natural disasters and help the community design and build everything they need. ARAN LOZANO: I would design my country-side house. Since I was a child I have been imagining it and making sketches. As I mature, travel and discover new influences I evolve the ideas. If I had made a sketch of each idea during these years, it would be a great visual diary of the experiences that have impressed me during my life, I imagine that the final project will gather all those moments.
How do you keep up with latest design trends? To what extent do design trends matter?
CLARA CAMPO: A dream project would be to be part of Google X team and design the perfect city.
How do you know if a product or project is well designed? How do you define good design?
CLARA CAMPO: There is no secret recipe for success. There’s a long journey of work, perseverance, trip overs and getting up back to work more. The secret ingredient is love, to be passionate on the work you do.
How do you decide if your design is ready?
CLARA CAMPO: I think my “legends” are basically architects, also with projects spanning from urban planning to buildings and furniture. Masters like Frank Lloyd Wright, Mies van der Rohe, Louis Kahn and Peter Zumthor.
What is your biggest design work?
CLARA CAMPO: I don’t have an exclusive favorite design. There’s so many good works in the world and through out history to be able to choose one. ARAN LOZANO: If I had to choose a design, I would keep the "schiphol-clock" clock of Maarten Baas, it is a piece that surprises, makes think about important issues in a nice way.
Who is your favourite designer?
CLARA CAMPO: With Amarist Studio, the greatest project we have done to date is “Welcome Jewelry”, a solidarity initiative to raise awareness and funds for refugees. Deeply touched by the current Syrian refugee crisis we transformed the razor wire installed along the southeastern European borders into a symbol of respect and support for the war-displaced people. All proceeds are donated to UNHCR – the United Nations Refugee Agency. ARAN LOZANO: The Welcome Jewelry solidarity collection. Although it is not in our usual field of action (collectible furniture) is a very special collection for us. Our work consisted in changing the meaning of a cruel element like the concertina installed in the borders. With a few small changes, we reconverted a physical border of wire into a beautiful collection of solidary jewelry to raise awareness and funds for the Refugees.
Would you tell us a bit about your lifestyle and culture?
CLARA CAMPO: Studying history of art, architecture and design. You can learn a lot going through the works of the great masters. ARAN LOZANO: You have to question yourself every day, it's the way to evolve. It is very important to not stay in the confort zone.
Would you tell us more about your work culture and business philosophy?
CLARA CAMPO: I would be working in the fields of innovation and business. ARAN LOZANO: Possibly I would have set up another company in some other creative area.
What positive experiences you had when you attend the A’ Design Award?
CLARA CAMPO: My team and my family. ARÁN LOZANO: The team that surrounds me and with whom I create the studio and also the family that decided to support me from the beginning of this adventure.

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