YINGRI GUAN

Specialized in Generative Design.

YINGRI GUAN

About YINGRI GUAN

Made in China, polished in Singapore, and currently living in the US, Yingri Guan is a multidisciplinary artist and designer based in Seattle. While working full-time as a start-up designer, she brainstorms and makes art during free time. She is also into traveling, reading, snowboarding, and cooking fusion dishes.

  • Winner of 4 A' Design Awards.
  • Specialized in Generative Design.
  • Original Design.
  • Creative, Diligent and Innovative.
  • All Designs
  • Generative
  • Art
Diatom Lights Illumination

Diatom Lights Illumination

Generative Design

Cava Light Installation

Cava Light Installation

Generative Design

Crystals Art Installation

Crystals Art Installation

Art Design

Ice Core Art Installation

Ice Core Art Installation

Art Design


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Interview with YINGRI GUAN

Could you please tell us more about your art and design background? What made you become an artist/designer? Have you always wanted to be a designer?
I started learning Chinese painting and calligraphy when I was six years old. Since then I've fallen in love with art and design. I painted freestyle paintings, wrote calligraphy, designed booklet, public boards. I've always wanted to be an artist creator, but it only became clear to me that I want to be a designer after high school graduation.
Can you tell us more about your company / design studio?
My design studio currently only has me as a member of this studio. I named it ARiceStudio after my nickname. The studio mostly explores ways to visualize reality through designs that combine art, mathematics, and technology.
What is "design" for you?
I see design as dancing with hands and legs cuffed. Meaning being creative with lots of limitations, solve problems from the fundamentals and at the same time bring delight to people.
What kinds of works do you like designing most?
I like all kinds of problems. Currently, I'm focusing on interaction and generative design. What excites me the most are projects that speculate, looking into the future, and give insights to reality.
What is your most favorite design, could you please tell more about it?
There are a lot of favorite designs. I mostly appreciate a lot of Japanese designs.
What was the first thing you designed for a company?
The first thing I designed was a Barbie loves Lacey book. It's a board book for girls. And I still remember the excitement when I saw it published in the market.
What is your favorite material / platform / technology?
My favorite material is acrylic glass. I use multiple platforms and software to design. Mainly processing, sketch, Adobe Creative Suite, and so on. The technology I use is digital design software and laser cut.
When do you feel the most creative?
I'm most creative after meditation or take a break in nature. Meditation clears my mind and nature does the same in terms of clearing my thoughts and make me feel recharged. After meditation, ideas just download instantly or I will get an idea all of a sudden that would solve the problem I was thinking about for a whilebefore the meditation.
Which aspects of a design do you focus more during designing?
I focus a lot on the emotional aspect when I design. I love people to be attracted to the aesthetic beauty of my designs, yet my designs would be functional. Most of all, I want people to feel happy and elated to see and own my design.
What kind of emotions do you feel when you design?
When I design, I mostly feel calm. I let the ideas flow through me and expressed through the work I create.
What kind of emotions do you feel when your designs are realized?
I feel accomplished and at the same time neutral. When the designs are realized, I feel I'm ready to move on to the next design project.
What makes a design successful?
A design is successful if it solves a problem elegantly. Good design is usually simple, simple to understand the usage and simple in the form. Elegance comes naturally when design is executed.
When judging a design as good or bad, which aspects do you consider first?
I would consider the problem-solving aspect of the design first. If this design solves a problem with the least amount of effort, it means that's good design.
From your point of view, what are the responsibilities of a designer for society and environment?
Designers do assume some really big responsibilities when it come to societal and environmental responsibilities. For example, packaging designers come in direct contact with the materials they will would using for their products.
How do you think the "design field" is evolving? What is the future of design?
I think "design filed" is evolving to be more important and people are embracing the idea of "design thinking". More and more companies think the design is an essential part of brand and company development. The future of design is that design would be the innovative force for helping with product development from the very beginning. Companies can use design principles and integrate design thinkings in a lot of areas to facilitate creative processes and drive innovations.
When was your last exhibition and where was it? And when do you want to hold your next exhibition?
My last exhibition was in early November. I want to hold my next exhibition once the pandemic eases. I am looking into ways of doing online exhibitions at the current moment.
Where does the design inspiration for your works come from? How do you feed your creativity? What are your sources of inspirations?
Most of my design inspirations come from nature. I am always interested in exploring and taking note of the natural patterns and those are meditative and nurtures my soul. Nature is also a place for me to recover and recharge powers to replenish my creativity.
How would you describe your design style? What made you explore more this style and what are the main characteristics of your style? What's your approach to design?
My design style is a combination of something technology and future thinking driven and yet offers organic feeling of the final output. It was a combination of factors that made me explore more of the style. I had a background in Chinese painting where a lot of deep seated hidden meanings are hidden in the strokes. Therefore, lots of human interpretations are required. Chinese painting is based on Yin and Yang, the human interactions and abstract philosophies, therefore giving its organic and highly sophisticated looks behind those paintings. Yet, I also integrate different new technology and data research into my work to give meaning to existing phenomenons. Therefore, there are a mixed combination of organic and future driven feelings to my work and yet they exist harmoniously together.
Where do you live? Do you feel the cultural heritage of your country affects your designs? What are the pros and cons during designing as a result of living in your country?
I am currently living in Seattle. Cultural heritage of China definitely affects my designs. For I find lots of traditional designs beautiful and seamless. For instance, the wood designs that requires no nails and yet ties together the structure of perfectly built buildings is just phenomenal. I often compare my designs to those concepts. Those are definitely my inspirations. I am currently living in the United States. While it is extremely inspiring and also fortunate to be in a design culture highly evolved to power technology development and lots of research has gone into the work of research to sell. I think those do influence how I design products and my views on design.
How do you work with companies?
I am currently an in-house designer working at a tech startup called Tile, Inc. Most of the time, I have internal clients and I would be designing for my own companies audience.
What are your suggestions to companies for working with a designer? How can companies select a good designer?
I think the best thing a company can do when working with a designer would have an open-minded view towards things. Think about how a lot of times, people could doubt the designs provided by designers.
Can you talk a little about your design process?
My design process is the same as current user experience design practices. Usually would be understand the problem, what problem would I be solving for. Then validate the problem is the problem I am solving for by doing user research and get clarification about the current processes. Once confirmed the problem I am solving for, then I would start with brainstorming to come up with as many ideas as possible. Iterations follow by validating with user research. When the initial design goal is achieved, we can call the initial phase of design to be accomplished at this point. If further follow up is needed, usually more iterations of design and research would be carried out. Of course, design is iterative and I'd love to always iterate on my designs.
What are 5 of your favorite design items at home?
At home, my favorite design items are rice cooker, teapot and tea set, smart switch, water bottle and robot vacuum cleaner.
Can you describe a day in your life?
My day in life usually starts with meditation by clearing my mind and set good intentions for the day. Once I get this process down. I would carry out some routines and then go to work. Usually, at work, there are dedicated meetings and also work time, it's pretty explanatory. But my work time is mostly defined by project needs.
Could you please share some pearls of wisdom for young designers? What are your suggestions to young, up and coming designers?
I think the most important thing is to be patient. It touches many aspects. We need to be patient with ourselves, where we are and where we'd like to go. Sweating over the things we have not achieved demoralizes and also could also reduce momentum. Patience with clients are also important. Most of the time, it comes down to communications and designers also find ourselves in the position to understand clients' needs and also educate them on how design works. That takes a lot of patience. Last but not least, patience with our work. Sometimes it just takes a little bit more pushing to get to the finish line. And patience is needed to keep us hang in there and be able to see the project through. Therefore, pearls of wisdom for young designers is patience and that could carry you a long way down the road.
From your perspective, what would you say are some positives and negatives of being a designer?
Positives in being a designer is that I get to solve problems all the time. It changed my perspective about how I live my life. I am much more observant than before and I am always noticing the different design intentions in everyday life. The negatives of being a designer is work is highly integrated into life. When we are not working, we are constantly observing and thinking about the problems, taking inspiration from our experiences. So there's no clear boundaries between work and play. But if you are ok with that, it could serve you really well.
What is your "golden rule" in design?
My golden rule in design is always to check what I can take out in the later process to accomplish the same problem solving goals.
What skills are most important for a designer?
Humility is the most important quality and also skills for designers. A humble designer is willing to learn all skills. Software and technical skills change all the time, the only things don't change are the overarching main theories for design and the main principles. A humble designer is willing to put their customer needs at the forefront and design for the problem. Therefore, the designer's design would solve for the actually problem, not just based on designer's own preferences or other factors.
Which tools do you use during design? What is inside your toolbox? Such as software, application, hardware, books, sources of inspiration etc.?
I meditate a lot to be able to come back to a creative state. Meditation really helps to clear the mind and set good intentions to innovate. A lot of my ideas come to me after meditation. This is because meditation empties the chaos in my mind and get it ready to receive new ideas.
Designing can sometimes be a really time consuming task, how do you manage your time?
The best way to time manage for me to set clear goals and be realistic. And set a timeframe of working hours for the day. Once you have accomplished the goals, you can go out and play. Set time to play and do nothing everyday. And design hours could be a set timeframe. Overtime, those timeframes become habit. Every time sit in front of the tables during those time frames, I'm automatically in the mindset to create and design. This really helps to drive up efficiency and hence saves time. However, understand that design is essentially a habit and to be enforced everyday.
How long does it take to design an object from beginning to end?
There is not really an end to a design and it's always iterative. However, the design end is defined by the time that we think we are at a stage we are somewhat satisfied with the state of design. Normally this process ideally stretches to about 3 months to enable sufficient time for design and iteration.
What is the most frequently asked question to you, as a designer?
Most of the time, people would ask me what are my perspective and goal for the projects I am working on. People would love to have a vision for the end product they would be seeing eventually.
What was your most important job experience?
I value every job experience and I can always learn from even the simplest design task. However the most memorable one was the working Reader's Digest and designing different books. I remember the excitement when I saw the book I designed was finally published. I was working with a lot of clients that I see in cartoons and also other channels.
Who are some of your clients?
I have worked at Reader's Digest, Brava, Inc. JusTalk app and Tile, Inc.
What type of design work do you enjoy the most and why?
I enjoy design works that requires complex logic and I have to solve the difficult puzzles to give the best solution. The other type of design work is my own creative projects. I usually also have side projects that I would assign myself to work on. Those projects are self-directed and
What are your future plans? What is next for you?
I'd love to continue building more works and exploring the combination of art, design, technology and science to make experiences that greatly help people's lives. What's next is I think I'd like to continue push myself in that direction but I am also open to what comes to me. I find that my path has been a combination of planning and surprises. Often times those surprises would lead me to something really exciting. So I don't have a solid plan for what exactly I'd be doing next. But I have a general direction of where I want to go and see from there.
Do you work as a team, or do you develop your designs yourself?
I usually work on projects on my own, but I work in a team environment. My coworkers take different features on the same product. However, we each own the different features we own and therefore a collaborative and also autonomy environment for my usual works.
Do you have any works-in-progress being designed that you would like to talk about?
I am currently working on a video establishing relationship between Chinese calligraphy, generative design and also mathematics.
How can people contact you?
My website is www.yingriguan.com and my email is yingriguan@gmail.com
Any other things you would like to cover that have not been covered in these questions?
I am also into cooking and I see that as another meditative and relaxing form of creation. If you have any recipes to share with me, please don't hesitate. I am always into discussions about how rice could be cooked differently and how people approach cooking. Or just anything you want to reach out and share. Love to connect.

Designer of the Day Interview with YINGRI GUAN

Could you please tell us about your experience as a designer, artist, architect or creator?
I started learning Chinese painting and calligraphy when I was six years old. Since then I've fell in love with art and design. I painted free style paintings, wrote calligraphy, designed booklet, public boards. I've always wanted to be an artist creator, but only became clear to me that I want to bea designer after high school graduation.
How did you become a designer?
I chose to become a designer. I knew that I could not be an engineer, or an account who my mom wants to me to be. It was a conscious choice. When I was in Singapore, I remember very clearly that I felt that I wanted none of the choices that was in front of me. I could no longer be in a profession that I could not feel the drive to be in. I did not choose the art as my subject during my A-Level studies. Being conforming to what's the norm and what everyone chooses for their combination was my default mentality. In a way, the conscious choice to become a designer was my first step in saying yes to what I want internally and break free from other noises around me.
What are your priorities, technique and style when designing?
My design style is a combination of something technology and future thinking driven and yet offers organic feeling of the final output. It was a combination of factors that made me explore more of the style. I had a background in Chinese painting where a lot of deep seated hidden meanings are hidden in the strokes. Therefore, lots of human interpretations are required. Chinese painting is based on Yin and Yang, the human interactions and abstract philosophies, therefore giving its organic and highly sophisticated looks behind those paintings. Yet, I also integrate different new technology and data research into my work to give meaning to existing phenomenons. Therefore, there are a mixed combination of organic and future driven feelings to my work and yet they exist harmoniously together.
Which emotions do you feel when designing?
I focus a lot on the emotional aspect when I design. I love people to be attracted to the aesthetics beauty of my designs, yet my designs would be functional.Most of all, I want people to feel happy and elated to see and own my design.
What particular aspects of your background shaped you as a designer?
I think the humility. Humility is the biggest enabler. When approaching a problem, humbleness allows me to empty my mind and really start to empathize with the audience and hence draft design solutions that would best suit the design problem. Humility also enables me to be always iterating on the design and understand there's no completion but just phases to designing. This mindset really helps me to always see different problems from different perspectives.
What is your growth path? What are your future plans? What is your dream design project?
I'd love to continue building more works and exploring the combination of art, design, technology and science to make experiences that greatly help people's lives. What's next is I think I'd like to continue push myself in that direction but I am also open to what comes to me. I find that my path has been a combination of planning and surprises. Often times those surprises would lead me to something really exciting. So I don't have a solid plan for what exactly I'd be doing next. But I have a general direction of where I want to go and see from there.
What are your advices to designers who are at the beginning of their career?
I believe that I am not a design legend yet. There are a lot of improvements ahead of me. However, to become a better designer, it always comes down to practice. By doing everyday, it's practicing the design processes everyday. It's about always focus on the process and constantly iterate and refine personal design theories and form your own design opinions.
You are truly successful as a designer, what do you suggest to fellow designers, artists and architects?
I think the most important thing is to be patient. It touches many aspects. We need to be patient with ourselves, where we are and where we'd like to go. Sweating over the things we have not achieved demoralizes and also could also reduce momentum. Patience with clients are also important. Most of the time, it comes down to communications and designers also find ourselves in the position to understand clients' needs and also educate them on how design works. That takes a lot of patience. Last but not least, patience with our work. Sometimes it just takes a little bit more pushing to get to the finish line. And patience is needed to keep us hang in there and be able to see the project through. Therefore, pearls of wisdom for young designers is patience and that could carry you a long way down the road.
What is your day to day look like?
Usually I start off my day with 15 minutes meditation to clear my head and mind to be able to jump start my day. Then I usually start reading some of the main articles on some of the design websites I follow. Then I would think about the major things and tasks I need to do for the day. Then my day would be go about accomplishing those goals and tasks. I really love walks in nature to meditate as well as getting inspirations. Nature keeps me happy and excited throughout the work day.
How do you keep up with latest design trends? To what extent do design trends matter?
I always lookout for design trends and news. I go to websites such as Dezeen, Design Milk and Muzli etc to discover what's happening in the current state. I usually would like to get to know the current trend and what's happening. However, I don't have rules or particular viewpoint whether my designs would adopt the current trend or constantly adapt to the current trend. I think design choices including style serves the purpose of the design problem. So I won't force the style in a particular fashion. However, I notice that good designs usually the style takes less precedence and design fades to the background and essentially it would just work. Hence, in the end, style, trend etc won't matter when it comes to good designs. Designs that simply works would stand out.
How do you know if a product or project is well designed? How do you define good design?
First of all, I usually look at if the design solves the actual problem. If it does, then it passed the bar of being a good design. Next, look at if the design speaks to its audience and if it's sustainable. Having the above criteria would make it being a good design. The telling part of whether it's a really good design is if this design is seamless and went a step above and beyond to elevate the solution. It gives the design solution a different and much better meaning and presence.
How do you decide if your design is ready?
I'd say design is never complete and there's always improvements can be done. I think it really varies based on projects. Some projects might have really clear problem definition early on and hence require less research to clarify problems. Most of the time, problems are more ambiguous, hence more research, more analysis are needed to clearly define the problem that the project is solving for. Hence , the duration is really hard to measure in terms of days. But in general, I'd measure by iterations, so mostly 3 iterations for it to come pretty close to the final forms to call a completion for the targeting phase of design.
What is your biggest design work?
I am most proud of a piece named Ice Core. It's an installation consisting of 8 wax tubes that visualize the last 400000 years of data of carbon emissions and temperature. Hence this piece provides the insights for global warming in the most intimate way and gives people a very direct viewing relationship with this broader concept. This piece is special because it's a combination of everything I like: art, design, technology, data and science. It's only the combination of those things have produced this piece that presented the reality to my audience in a new way. The most challenging aspect was the making of the tubes. Every layer of the wax was molten and spread over on top of each other. It was the most time consuming and yet hugely satisfying project as people really enjoyed seeing the piece so close up. I am currently working on a project exploring marine creatures and their patterns.
Who is your favourite designer?
I really admire Kenya Hara, Tokujin Yoshioka and Naoto Fukusawa. The reason I really like those designers is because they know how to express their philosophy, design opinions in the most simple language and gestures. Their designs are simple but elegant. Each piece of design seems so intuitive and natural to be the designs they have done. I think they are the examples for good design because I just forget they are designs. The design become part of the product/object and integrated seamlessly. If I have the chance, I'd love to speak with eohMingPei. His architecture is all over the world and I admire his courage for designing and standing by his own design in regards to the glass pyramid in front of the Louvre. I'd love to learn from him to have such belief in his own design and stand in firm ground to see his design come into fruition.
Would you tell us a bit about your lifestyle and culture?
I am currently living in Seattle. Cultural heritage of China definitely affects my designs. For I find lots of traditional designs beautiful and seamless. For instance, the wood designs that requires no nails and yet ties together the structure of perfectly built buildings is just phenomenal. I often compare my designs to those concepts. Those are definitely my inspirations. I am currently living in the United States. While it is extremely inspiring and also fortunate to be in a design culture highly evolved to power technology development and lots of research has gone into the work of research to sell. I think those do influence how I design products and my views on design.
Would you tell us more about your work culture and business philosophy?
I think an ideal design partner would be someone who would inspire and challenge each other at the same time. They never shut down any ideas but would push further the design ideas to achieve the best possible results. I do believe in co-design, but precedences need to put set forth to ensure successful collaboration. The most important characteristic for a designer would be patience in my perspective. Why? This is because whether it is about understanding design problems, having the patience to keep iterating on the designs and gathering feedback. Also involves having the patience to follow through with the implementation if needed. Patience requires flexibility to be open to changes. Also designers utilize patience to keep getting better and better.
What are your philanthropic contributions to society as a designer, artist and architect?
I am always contributing to the society to give back as a global citizen. As a designer, I have always taken up non-profit projects since 2002. Some highlights of projects I have worked on: a catalogue for teaching English to immigrants, designing logos for a domestic violence support organization, design for garbage sorting system etc. Since 2017, I have started contributing a substantial piece for charity auction each year and has seen really good response since then. In 2018, Artspan San Francisco auction, I sold a piece in support of Bay Area artists. In 2019, Luminous SF, an acrylic glass heart was sold, all proceeds goes into supporting medical research and education. I'd love to keep contributing to these organizations and see myself really push the boundaries in terms of design and also practices.
What positive experiences you had when you attend the A’ Design Award?
By participating in A'Design Award, I had the opportunity in meeting other excellent designers all over the world and having good interaction in terms of exchange of design philosophies. This competition has greatly expanded my horizons and raised bars for myself. I also really enjoy the different opportunities to participate in the international exhibitions to showcase my work. Design competitions becomes very motivational for my career as it encourages me to get out there and seeing what's out there. I feel honored and excited to be recognized as the Designer of the Day.

Extended Interview with YINGRI GUAN

Could you please tell us about your experience as a designer, artist, architect or creator?
I started learning Chinese painting and calligraphy when I was six years old. Since then I've fell in love with art and design. I painted free style paintings, wrote calligraphy, designed booklet, public boards. I've always wanted to be an artist creator, but only became clear to me that I want to be a designer after high school graduation.
How did you become a designer?
The most important factor that motivates me to become a designer is creativity involved in everyday life. Design offers me the opportunity to observe, see the world in a different light, dig to the bottom of problems that interest me, draft a concept and through iterations, seeing that idea come to life and be out in the world. Whether it can make a difference, the creative gesture and constant evolution is what inspires me to design. It is just satisfying for me.
What are your priorities, technique and style when designing?
I chose to become a designer. I knew that I could not be an engineer, or an account who my mom wants to me to be. It was a conscious choice. When I was in Singapore, I remember very clearly that I felt that I wanted none of the choices that was in front of me. I could no longer be in a profession that I could not feel the drive to be in. I did not choose the art as my subject during my A-Level studies. Being conforming to what's the norm and what everyone chooses for their combination was my default mentality. In a way, the conscious choice to become a designer was my first step in saying yes to what I want internally and break free from other noises around me.
Which emotions do you feel when designing?
Currently, I am interested in designing products that simply delight people. The products have a very broad definition, whether it's a digital interface, tangible object, 2-D graphic layout or interior layout. Any creation that combines the knowledge of design, art, mathematics and science to express reality and provoke contemplations are my inspirations to work on.
What particular aspects of your background shaped you as a designer?
I believe that I am not a design legend yet. There are a lot of improvements ahead of me. However, to become a better designer, it always comes down to practice. By doing everyday, it's practicing the design processes everyday. It's about always focus on the process and constantly iterate and refine personal design theories and form your own design opinions.
What is your growth path? What are your future plans? What is your dream design project?
Good designers usually solves for the problems and provide solutions that address the problems. Great designers are willing to dig to the fundamentals and aim to redefine the problem if necessary. Great designers usually help to revolutionize a design problem. Great design is invisible. It almost feels like it wasn’t designed at all. This is what differentiate good from great designers. Good designers will rely on their technical skills and base their design on principles (a machine could learn that by the way), but great designers bring more to the equation. I think that this is what creativity really is.
What are your advices to designers who are at the beginning of their career?
First of all, I usually look at if the design solves the actual problem. If it does, then it passed the bar of being a good design. Next, look at if the design speaks to its audience and if it's sustainable. Having the above criteria would make it being a good design. The telling part of whether it's a really good design is if this design is seamless and went a step above and beyond to elevate the solution. It gives the design solution a different and much better meaning and presence.
You are truly successful as a designer, what do you suggest to fellow designers, artists and architects?
From business perspective, good design is more valued today because it sells, makes a good impression and hence more profits. From consumer perspective, good designs benefit our everyday life. Everything is designed and the good designs really improve our lives. From society's perspective, design drives innovation. The design process motivate people to analyze problems, concept solutions and great innovations come through that process and that's when society gets to be pushed forward at a faster speed and at the same time with
What is your day to day look like?
I'd love to design home interiors and for people who I'd trust.
How do you keep up with latest design trends? To what extent do design trends matter?
I am really looking forward to build a large public interaction installation. In that setting, people can enjoy the art together with their loved ones, family and friends. It's full of joy and delight.
How do you know if a product or project is well designed? How do you define good design?
I think the secret recipe of success in design is by doing, same as other professions. There are talents and also intuitions involved in design. But when it comes to what makes great designers, it's always through constant practice and experience.
How do you decide if your design is ready?
I am always inspired by Tokujin Yoshioka, Kenya Hara, Naoto Fukasawa and Yuri Suzuki.
What is your biggest design work?
My favorite design would be Zojirushi rice cooker. The automation of rice cooking on this machine makes life so convenient and also cooked to preferred taste.
Who is your favourite designer?
My greatest design would be designs combining art, design, technology and mathematics to format physical visualizations that gives meaning to reality.
Would you tell us a bit about your lifestyle and culture?
I think to be better designers, it's always by doing. When people have good ideas, sketch them, concept them, ask for feedback and iterate to improve them. Just like how Tim Notke said “Hard work beats talent when talent doesn’t work hard.”Everyone get better not by whimsical luck by hard practice everyday.
Would you tell us more about your work culture and business philosophy?
I would probably become an artist. I've said in a TV interview when I was 9 years old that I'd always want to be an artist. I might have chosen a different path in the beginning because of family and societal pressure, but I believe I'd end up being an artist eventually if I hadn't become a designer.
What are your philanthropic contributions to society as a designer, artist and architect?
Design is a form of creation, solving the problems, bring delights to the fundamental problem. It's becoming like air for breathing. When working on design, I feel energized, every nerve would be so charged.
What positive experiences you had when you attend the A’ Design Award?
I've came across many supporters along the way, family, friends, professors, supervisors. All of them form my support team and they function different roles when I need support.

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