Ignas Survila

Good in Vehicle Design.

Ignas Survila

About Ignas Survila

The old-school approach to mobility requires innovation. Urban pollution, traffic jams, and climate change are a few of the many problems to solve. These problems resonate deeply with me, and I am already doing my best to tackle it. My name is Ignas Survila, and I am an experienced founder with a demonstrated history of working in the mobility industry. I have skills in product design, advertising, branding & identity, manufacturing management, business development, and entrepreneurship. Lately, I was the Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Unicorn Scooters and have long been inspired to work on last-mile transportation solutions in large part. Throughout my career, I have been at the forefront of innovative transportation solutions. Most recently as a pioneer in the kick scooter industry serving as Chief Executive Officer of Citybirds Sarl and General manager at Citybirds Sarl Lithuanian Branch. During four years I helped Citybirds to design, develop and launch four different sustainable products from the idea to the mass production, developed and executed short/long-term business strategies, created supply chain strategy, sales strategy, investor decks, and financial roadmaps. Moreover, I helped to attract investors to invest in Citybirds, and together with a fantastic team, we launched a successful crowdfunding campaign. Finally, I have successfully sold my part of the company to the investors from Switzerland. Citybirds, together with Unicorn Scooters, has been awarded 15 worldwide known design awards, including two Red Dots and three A'Design Awards.

  • Winner of 4 A' Design Awards.
  • Good in Vehicle Design.
  • Original Design.
  • Creative, Diligent and Innovative.
  • All Designs
  • Vehicle
Pigeon kick scooter

Pigeon kick scooter

Vehicle Design

Raven Kick Scooter

Raven Kick Scooter

Vehicle Design

Eagle Electric kick scooter

Eagle Electric kick scooter

Vehicle Design

Unicorn Electric Scooter For Sharing

Unicorn Electric Scooter For Sharing

Vehicle Design


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Interview with Ignas Survila

Could you please tell us more about your art and design background? What made you become an artist/designer? Have you always wanted to be a designer?
My name is Ignas Survila, and I am an experienced founder with a demonstrated history of working in the mobility industry. I have skills in product design, advertising, branding & identity, manufacturing management, business development, and entrepreneurship. I have an MBA and a Bachelor’s in Industrial design from the Vilnius Academy of Arts.
Can you tell us more about your company / design studio?
Lately, I was the Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Unicorn Scooters and have long been inspired to work on last-mile transportation solutions in large part. Throughout my career, I have been at the forefront of innovative transportation solutions. Most recently as a pioneer in the kick scooter industry serving as Chief Executive Officer of Citybirds Sarl and General manager at Citybirds Sarl Lithuanian Branch. During four years I helped Citybirds to design, develop and launch four different sustainable products from the idea to the mass production, developed and executed short/long-term business strategies, created supply chain strategy, sales strategy, investor decks, and financial roadmaps. Moreover, I helped to attract investors to invest in Citybirds, and together with a fantastic team, we launched a successful crowdfunding campaign. Finally, I have successfully sold my part of the company to the investors from Switzerland. Citybirds, together with Unicorn Scooters, has been awarded 15 worldwide known design awards, including two Red Dots and three A'Design Awards.
What is "design" for you?
Nowadays, the design is not only about the materials you chose, shape, or function you create. On the contrary, it is a super complicated process which involves designer to become a part of marketing, physics, engineering, business, political or social movement, sustainability, advertising, etc. I am genuinely grateful and happy to be a part of this fantastic ecosystem, and I am enjoying creating a better routine for all the people around the globe.
What kinds of works do you like designing most?
The old-school approach to mobility requires innovation. Urban pollution, traffic jams, and climate change are a few of the many problems to solve. These problems resonate deeply with me, therefore, this is the field I like designing the most.
What was the first thing you designed for a company?
One of the first things I have designed was the Medal for the Nike Marathon. It was such a fantastic experience to make the design, which finally appeared in reality. Of course, at that time, I didn't have experience in manufacturing; therefore, the visualization was slightly different from the real one. It was shocking at first, but after some time, I was happy that I could touch, and a lot of athletes still have my medal in their homes.
What is your favorite material / platform / technology?
I do not have a favorite material or technology. I love to have the freedom to learn new things and use different techniques in designing new items.
When do you feel the most creative?
Everyday. Every single day is a chance for me to do something. Time is the most valuable asset, and I am trying to use it responsibly.
Which aspects of a design do you focus more during designing?
Sustainability is the most crucial aspect of design. I genuinely believe that the term "good design" should be changed to "design good". Designers must think not only about the exterior of the item or system. We all should focus on the origin of the materials, ecology, and sustainable supply chain. It is the societal task of a designer to create the future and neither to beautify the presence nor to manipulate consumers.
What kind of emotions do you feel when you design?
The processes are usually very different. I am often trying to design everything based on vast research, and the design is just an outcome of the deep analysis I create. Therefore, there's no much romantics in this process. It's hard, consistent work.
What kind of emotions do you feel when your designs are realized?
Probably this is the best part of the whole process of design when a designer can finally touch the creation. Brains get a lot of dopamine, and that's a fantastic moment to experience.
What makes a design successful?
The term "successful" is wrong, I guess. For some people, it could be seen as an enormous success, while for others, it could be just a normal process. Therefore, I am always trying to avoid such exaggerations. In design, I try to reject as many unnecessary details and leave the essence of the product. It's probably the hardest part, but I believe that consumers like simplicity.
From your point of view, what are the responsibilities of a designer for society and environment?
The design should be a part of the solution, not of the problem. Therefore, designers should design responsibly thinking not only about themselves but about the global environment.
How do you think the "design field" is evolving? What is the future of design?
It's getting better, but still, there are a lot of problems, especially speaking about the sustainable aspects of the designs that we buy every single day from the shelves. I truly believe that design should be the leader, not the follower. And I hope that it would change.
When was your last exhibition and where was it? And when do you want to hold your next exhibition?
The last exhibition I participated was in 2019, "Geneva innovations" in Geneva, Switzerland.
Where does the design inspiration for your works come from? How do you feed your creativity? What are your sources of inspirations?
I love reading books. I usually read different types of books, which inspires me a lot. Moreover, I am always trying to share my thoughts and listen to other people. It's vital because you can get a lot of essential information about the problems that other people are facing. My most Favorite Books in 2019: ‘The Shallows What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains’ by Nicolas Carr. ‘Walk Through Walls: A Memoir’ by Marina Abramovic. Trilogy by Yuval Noah Harari (Sapiens, Deus, 21 lessons) ‘Factfulness’ by Hans Rosling. ‘Zero to One’ by Peter Thiel. ‘Fear: Trump in the White House’ by Bob Woodward. ‘Start with Why’ by Simon Sinek. ‘Shoe Dog’ by Phil Knight.
How would you describe your design style? What made you explore more this style and what are the main characteristics of your style? What's your approach to design?
Contentful. I love to create items that matter. I would like to believe that this could be evident from my works.
Where do you live? Do you feel the cultural heritage of your country affects your designs? What are the pros and cons during designing as a result of living in your country?
I am currently live in Vilnius, a magical, small city in Lithuania. I born there. Thus, Vilnius is an integral part of myself. It has a breathtaking nature as well as cozy streets, and welcoming people. I love my city, and it is a massive inspiration for me.
How do you work with companies?
Usually, I do not work for other companies. I love to experience the whole process from the idea to mass production. Therefore, I am trying to fund my ideas and realize them with my team. Nevertheless, lately, I am trying to help other companies or startups with their struggles and often advise them on business development, marketing, and design.
Can you talk a little about your design process?
1.Problem detection. 2.Analysis. 3.Sketch. 4.Consumer feedback collection. 5.Prototype v.1. 6.Consumer test v.1. 7.Modifications according to the consumer feedback v.1. 8.Prototype v.2. 9.Consumer test v.2. 10.Modifications according to the consumer feedback v.2. 11.Prototype v.3. 12.Consumer test v.3. 13.Preparation for the production.
Can you describe a day in your life?
7:00 Wake up 7:00-8:00 Breakfast, Shower, etc. 8:00-8:45 Reading 9:00 At work. 19:00 Run. 20:00 Friends. 22:00 Sleep.
From your perspective, what would you say are some positives and negatives of being a designer?
The most positive part of being a designer is that you can help other people to tackle their problems. The negative part is that because of the massive consumerism we are facing today, a lot of designers are creating stuff without thinking about the others, the earth, and sustainability.
What is your "golden rule" in design?
Consumers should be in love with your designs, not creator. Being in love with your design creates walls and narrows the view. Therefore, do not become in love with your creation.
What skills are most important for a designer?
Broad thinking, broad knowledge, being self-criticizing, being multi-functional, being flexible.
Which tools do you use during design? What is inside your toolbox? Such as software, application, hardware, books, sources of inspiration etc.?
Pen and paper are usually the starter kit of the creation. The second step is generally physical prototype creation for testing if the idea works in reality. It's an essential part since, on paper or screen, the ideas work all the time. However, it's not true.
How long does it take to design an object from beginning to end?
Let's define the "End" first. If the end is to render the beautiful picture is one, if it's a prototype is two, but if the product should appear on the shelves, it takes up to two years to design something from scratch to the mass production.
What was your most important job experience?
Probably being a Chief Executive Officer of Citybirds Sarl was the most inspiring job experience until now. It was so complex and multifunctional, that I truly believe that it was the greatest school for me.
Who are some of your clients?
Lay's, Kent, Kalnapilis, Utena, Baltoji varnelė, ReDirected, Tsarsky Pokrov, Pure brandy, Nike, DnB, Tele2, Panorama, Adobe
What are your future plans? What is next for you?
The old-school approach to mobility requires innovation. Urban pollution, traffic jams, and climate change are a few of the many problems to solve. These problems resonate deeply with me, and I am already doing my best to tackle it. But it's not enough. I am keen to learn more and have even more power to make an impact. It is, for this reason, I would love to work for some automotive giant and do my best to innovate the field of mobility.

Extended Interview with Ignas Survila

Could you please tell us about your experience as a designer, artist, architect or creator?
I have an MBA and a Bachelor’s in Industrial design from the Vilnius Academy of Arts. The full list of education is bellow: 2019 Harvard Business School Sustainable Business Strategy 2014- 2016 Master’s Degree at Vilnius Academy of Arts Industrial Design & Product Design 2013- 2014 The exchange at the University of Lapland Industrial Design & Product Design 2010- 2014 Bachelor’s Degree at Vilnius Academy of Arts Industrial Design & Product Design
How did you become a designer?
The old-school approach to mobility requires innovation. Urban pollution, traffic jams, and climate change are a few of the many problems to solve. These problems resonate deeply with me, and I am already doing my best to tackle it. But it's not enough. I am keen to learn more and have even more power to make an impact.
Which emotions do you feel when designing?
I like to create designs that matter. That has a contentful meaning and is sustainable.
What particular aspects of your background shaped you as a designer?
Sustainability is the most crucial aspect of design. I genuinely believe that the term "good design" should be changed to "design good". Designers must think not only about the exterior of the item or system. We all should focus on the origin of the materials, ecology, and sustainable supply chain. It is the societal task of a designer to create the future and neither to beautify the presence nor to manipulate consumers.
What is your growth path? What are your future plans? What is your dream design project?
Being multi-functional, flexible and deep distinguishes the good designer from a great one. Nowadays, the design is not only about the materials you chose, shape, or function you create. On the contrary, it is a super complicated process which involves designer to become a part of marketing, physics, engineering, business, political or social movement, sustainability, advertising, etc.
What are your advices to designers who are at the beginning of their career?
I think that the question shouldn't be about "good design". I believe that the question should be asked: "how to design in good"? How to build the process, which would be sustainable from A to Z. How to make a supply chain that truly works and how to use materials that are not polluting our planet. These are the questions that should be highlighted.
You are truly successful as a designer, what do you suggest to fellow designers, artists and architects?
The design should be a part of the solution, not of the problem. I think that when a designer can achieve making the solution reality, then it is a fantastic accomplishment for everyone.
How do you know if a product or project is well designed? How do you define good design?
The term "success" is wrong, I guess. For some people, it could be seen as an enormous success, while for others, it could be just a normal process. Therefore, I am always trying to avoid such exaggerations. In design, I try to reject as many unnecessary details and leave the essence of the product. It's probably the hardest part, but I believe that consumers like the simplicity.
Would you tell us a bit about your lifestyle and culture?
I love reading books. I usually read different types of books, which inspires me a lot. I think that books can inspire people and help to open new opportunities. My most Favorite Books in 2019: ‘The Shallows What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains’ by Nicolas Carr. ‘Walk Through Walls: A Memoir’ by Marina Abramovic. Trilogy by Yuval Noah Harari (Sapiens, Deus, 21 lessons) ‘Factfulness’ by Hans Rosling. ‘Zero to One’ by Peter Thiel. ‘Fear: Trump in the White House’ by Bob Woodward. ‘Start with Why’ by Simon Sinek. ‘Shoe Dog’ by Phil Knight.

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